International Society of Political Psychology

Advances in Political Psychology

The second publication of the International Society of Political Psychology

Given the continued growth and explosion of information and interest in political psychology, there is an increasing need for a place where cumulative research findings and theoretical developments are synthesized and integrated in a form accessible to the scholar, student, and practitioner.

The Advances in Political Psychology annual series is intended to fill this need by recording the state of the field and highlighting innovative developments so that those who are interested can keep abreast of what is happening in political psychology. Each annual volume will include a selection articles that capture the diversity of subject matter studied by political psychologists.


Editor:

Howard Lavine · University of Minnesota

Editorial Board Members:

  • Gian Vittorio Caprara · University of Rome
  • Mark Dechesne · Leiden University
  • Peter Ditto · University of California, Irvine
  • John Duckitt · University of Auckland
  • Agnieszka Golec de Zavala · Goldsmiths, University of London
  • Eva Green · University of Lausanne
  • John Hibbing · University of Nebraska
  • Christopher Johnston · Duke University
  • Dan Kahan · Yale University
  • Cindy Kam · Vanderbilt University
  • Aaron Kay · Duke University
  • Richard Ned Lebow · Dartmouth University
  • Jennifer Jerit · Stony Brook University
  • Shana Levin · Claremont-McKenna College
  • Elizabeth Levy-Paluck · Princeton University
  • Tali Mendelberg · Princeton University
  • Joanne Miller · University of Minnesota
  • Alex Mintz · Interdisciplinary Center - Herzliya
  • Jaime Napier · Yale University
  • Paul Nesbitt-Larking · Huron University College
  • Victor Ottati · Loyola University
  • Michael Bang Peterson · Aarhus University
  • Martin Rosema · University of Twente
  • Marc Ross · Bryn Mawr College
  • Thomas Rudolph · University of Illinois
  • Michal Shamir · Tel Aviv University
  • Dean Keith Simonton · University of California, Davis
  • Rune Slothuus · Aarhus University
  • Marco Steenbergen · University of Zurich
  • Jacquelien van Stekelenburg · Vrije University (VU)
  • Hulda Thorisdottir · University of Iceland
  • Nicholas Valentino · University of Michigan


Advances in Political Psychology, Volume 1

Publication Date: January 21, 2014

1. Political Neuroscience: The Beginning of a Beautiful Friendship (John T. Jost, Hannah Nam, Jay Van Bavel, and David M. Amodio, Department of Psychology, New York University)

2. Networks, Contexts, and the Combinatorial Dynamics of Democratic Politics (Robert Huckfeldt, Department of Political Science, University of California, Davis)

3. The Psychology of Radicalization and Deradicalization: How Significance Quest Impacts Violent Extremism (Arie W. Kruglanski, Michele J. Gelfand, Jocelyn Belanger, START Center, University of Maryland; Rohan Gunaratna, Institute for Political Violence and Terrorism Research, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; and Malkanthi Hettiarachchi Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism Centre, Macquarie University, Australia)

4. Political Ecology: On the Mutual Formation of Biology and Culture (Rose McDermott, Department of Political Science, Brown University; and Peter Hatemi, Department of Political Science, Penn State University)

5. The Social and Political Implications of Moral Conviction (Linda J. Skitka, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Chicago; and G. Scott Morgan, Department of Psychology, Drew University)

6. Political Parties, Motivated Reasoning, and Public Opinion Formation (Thomas J. Leeper and Rune Slothuus, Department of Political Science and Government, University of Aarhus, Denmark)



Advances in Political Psychology, Volume 2

Publication Date: January 21, 2015

1. Expressive Rationality and Cultural Polarization: Theory and Evidence (Dan Kahan, Yale Law School)

2. The Illusion of Choice in Democratic Politics (Charles Taber and Milton Lodge, Department of Political Science, Stony Brook University)

3. The Cycle of Violence: Causes and Consequences of Participation in Violent Groups (Betsy Levy Paluck and Rebecca Littman, Department of Psychology, Princeton University)

4. Source Cue Spillover Effects (Michael Tesler, Department of Political Science, Brown University)

5. Direct and Indirect Emotion Regulation as a New Path for Conflict Resolution (Eran Halperin, School of Psychology, IDC, Herzliya, Israel)

6. Evolutionary Political Psychology: A Primer (Michael Bang Peterson, Department of Political Science and Government, University of Aarhus, Denmark)